Southwark Park: walking

This is a guest post by Caroline Clipson, who coordinates the Southwark Dementia Action Alliance. She’s teaming up with TfL, Walk London and Cool Tan Arts to create this sensory walk in Southwark Park for people affected by dementia.

Caroline has helped create a sensory walk for people living with dementia and their loved ones

Sensory walks are a great form of gentle exercise and getting outdoors is hugely important for people with dementia. We want to help friends and families explore new ways of engaging with loved ones by sharing their love of nature – enjoying the smells, sounds, textures and exceptional autumn colours of our local park.

“I work on a local gardening and reminiscence project, so I see how important it is that elderly people continue to connect with nature.”
Caroline Clipson, Southwark Dementia Action Alliance

We want to help people explore ways of engaging with loved ones by sharing their love of nature

Southwark Park opened in 1869, it was the first urban park in London. While this is interesting, we don’t dig much deeper into historical facts during our sensory walk, instead, we rely on the flora and fauna to tell the story of this stunning park.

There are a huge variety of trees, gardens and unique features all within a gentle stroll of each other. It’s well known by locals so it often holds special memories for people.

We want all parks across London to be accessible for people with dementia. That means we need their staff to understand and support people with the condition to feel welcome. We’re asking parks and other organisations to become Dementia Friends today.

By supporting people living with dementia to get outdoors and enjoy walking, we can all help people with the condition, and their carers, live well.

Southwark Park offers a variety of trees and gardens all within a gentle stroll of each other.

More on walking in London

Transport for London sponsors three walking weekends every year to help Londoners enjoy the city’s best walking routes and motivate people to walk more often.Autumn Ambles’ takes place in September, ‘Spring into Summer’ in May and ‘Winter Wanders’ in January. To see all walks, visit the Walk London website.

In his draft Transport Strategy, the Mayor wants Londoners to walk for at least 20 minutes each day to keep mentally and physically healthy. At TfL, we are making a wide range of improvements to London’s streets, junctions and public spaces, including the installation of more than 1,700 Legible London signs across the Capital, making it easier and more enjoyable to walk around London.

See more information about walking in the Capital and download TfL’s Walking Tube at tfl.gov.uk/walking

London’s streets now have more than 1,700 Legible London signs, making it easier and more enjoyable to walk around London.

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