TFL staff Walk the Line for health

This is a guest post by Rachel Clark, Health Promotion Manager at World Cancer Research Fund UK.

World Cancer Research Fund UK set TfL staff a challenge to walk the equivalent of the Central Line.

In today’s workplace many of us are becoming more and more sedentary, often sitting for hours at a time. Unfortunately, this inactivity can have serious health implications. According to a Lancet report, physical inactivity is responsible for 17 per cent of premature deaths in the UK every year and shortens a person’s lifespan by three to five years. World Cancer Research Fund’s evidence has also found that being physically active can decrease the risk of a number of different cancers.

Fitting more physical activity into our working days can be hard for many us. That’s why health and wellbeing workplace programmes are so important. They not only have health benefits for a company’s workforce but they can also have a direct impact on the company itself – reducing sickness, increasing employee satisfaction and increasing productivity.

TfL staff took up the challenge, walking over 65,200 steps and burning around 2,800 calories.

TfL has launched a great workplace initiative called “Movement Matters” as part of their 4 Steps to Health programme, to get their staff moving more, and to help with their campaign, we set a challenge for TfL staff. This saw over 170 of them Walk the Line in a week – competing against each other to walk the equivalent of the Central Line. That’s all the way from Ealing Broadway to Epping, a total of 32.6 miles. Walkers took 65,200 steps and burnt around 2,800 calories!

Walking is simple, free and one of the easiest ways to get more active and reduce cancer risk. So, whether you decide to Walk the Line or take part in another activity this summer, why not use our exercise calorie calculator to see how many calories you are burning? 

For more information on walking in London, including suggested routes, maps, info on the health benefits and more, see the walking section on the TfL website

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